Little Lin Hao – a survivor, hero, and example

I’ve moved this post to my new Life-Engineering blog, dedicated to motivating people to achieve their goals and change their futures by taking control of their lives.

You can now find this post here:

http://life-engineering.com/little-lin-hao-a-survivor-hero-and-example/

34 replies
  1. Bryan says:

    i read about this little hero after the earthquake of China…
    this boy is extraordinary… with a good and selfless heart..
    he deserves to carry China’s flag in Beijing olympics…
    i am truly inspored…

    i agree wit you rusty..

    bryan
    philippines

    Reply
  2. Claudia Moreira ZANARDI says:

    Precisamos nos espelhar em atitudes como essa desse pequeno e grande heroi Lin, que  exemplo de companherismo  teve para com seus colegas, é uma atitude tão rara hoje em dia entre os adultos, por isso chego a me emocionar com tão grande atitude dessa pessoinha linda Lin Hao

    Reply
  3. Linda says:

    Very sweet and great post
    – thank you Rusty!

    As Little LinHao’s god mother, I am just so proud of him!

    He encouraged China with his courage and his selflessness. And I bet the world is lightened up “When THE child is born”.
    I just love him so, my little LinHao, my little hero and my little angel!

    Reply
    • Jane Doe says:

      盲从之心,人皆有之……
      你有想过那些失去双亲甚至自己死去的孩子们吗?!

      唉··这就是你所谓的“好心”……

      Reply
  4. Linda says:

    On behalf of Little Lin Hao:

    Dear Uncle Rusty,

    thank you for your encouragement and support!

    Welcome to my hometown, to Sichuan with your 6 lovely kids and their “beautiful and inspiring” mom!

    I believe that my home town and Sichuan will be as beautiful as before when it gets well recovered.

    Sincerely,

    Little Lin Hao

    Reply
  5. Rusty Lindquist says:

    Linda, and Lin – Wow, what an honor! I’m so happy you found my little post, and happier still that you both took the time to comment and say hi.

    Linda,

    I’m sure you are so proud of him. What an inspiration he is… wise, strong, capable, reliable, loving, and thoughtful. Lin represents all that is good in the world, and all that we should work to become ourselves.
    I’m so happy to have found his story.

    Lin,

    I love hearing you call me uncle! It brought back so many memories… Almost 13 years ago (wow, that sounds like a long time, but it seems like just yesterday), I learned Mandarin Chinese and served a mission in Sydney Australia amongst the Chinese people there. More than almost anything, I just loved getting to know the young Chinese children, hearing their jokes, seeing their energy, and they all called me “Uncle” too!

    Lin, I am so sorry that you have had to experience such sadness. I lost my parents too when I was just a bit older than you, albeit under very different circumstances (about me. But my new family offered me strength and a stable environment, and it sure sounds like you’re well cared for now with your new family.

    It’s hard sometimes to know why we’re given such challenges, and sometimes it just doesn’t seem fair. But I really believe that all these things give us experience, and shall be for our good. They shape us in unique ways that prepare us for great things, and Lin, I believe you are destined for great things.

    Sort of like making a fine steel sword. The metal must be tempered, put under great heat, and a blacksmith will hammer out the impurities, cool it, and then repeat the process. All the while the metal becomes purer and stronger. In a similar way, your trials are making you stronger.

    Already you have shown such incredible strength of character. I’d love to see what lies in your future.
    I hope someday I can come to Sichuan (I have many friends from there). Most importantly, if you ever want to come to America, please know you’ll always have a place to stay here!

    With great respect,
    Rusty

    Reply
  6. Linda says:

    Dear Rusty,

    Thank you for such expressive replies.
    You said exactly the way it is by “making a fine steel sword”.
    Let’s hope the best for Lin Hao and all the children, the future of the world.

    Sorry I forgot that you speak Chinese and you have already got attached with Chinese children.

    Good news: Lin Hao’s Dad and Mom are survived
    – They were both working in the field at the quake moment, and they helped others as volunteers. His Dad was one of the local farmers who helped to find the missing hero helicopter after climbing over several mountains.

    Take care Rusty!

    On behalf of Lin Hao,

    Dear Rusty Shu Shu,

    Xie xie your trust and offer!
    I am going to study hard to repay all the kindness people ever give to me. And I am going to learn English well to visit you and to study at Harvard someday.

    Looking forward to meeting you!

    Best wishes,

    Hao

    Reply
  7. Rusty Lindquist says:

    That is fantastic news! After the opening ceremonies I had researched Lin’s story and found one report saying that, which made me so sad. I’m so happy to hear, and thank you for the correction. I have updated the post above. Please let me know if anything else needs correcting. I’d far prefer to have the fully accurate version!

    Hao,

    Na li, na li. Wo zhen gao xing jian dao ni. Wo xiang ni hao li hai, er chye wo jueda ni shr fei chang te bye.

    Harvord yi ding shr ge hen bang de da xue. Wo jen xiang xing ni swo yo xiang dzwo de, dou neng dzwo!

    Ke neng, yo yi tian, wo ke yi lai dao Jung Gwo. Wo hen xiang chyu. Dan shr, ru gwo wo mei yo ji hwei, wo ke yi lai kan ni zai harvord! LOL.

    Wo jyu ne hao yun.

    Rusty

    (p.s. the Chinese in Australia gave me a Chinese name… Lin Rwo Jye… na ge Lin jiou shr shwang mu lin. Nin de “Lin” ye shr “Shwang mu lin” ma?)

    Reply
  8. Linda says:

    Hi Rusty,

    Hao and his older sister did lose connections with their Dad and mom at the beginning. They did not know who was still alive or not till about 1 week later when people told Dad and Mom that Hao was on TV. It was at that moment that Hao burst into crying in his Dad’s arms when Dad hurried to Quake Children Centre in Chengdu- so touching and exciting!
    Pl see some pictures +vedio here
    http://tieba.baidu.com/f?ct=&tn=&rn=&pn=&lm=&kw=%C1%D6%BA%C6&rs2=0&myselectvalue=1&word=%C1%D6%BA%C6&tb=on

    Thanks for writing to Hao in Chinese Pinyin.
    I will pass him your message this evening.

    Yes, Hao has the same family name as yours: 2 woods = forest.
    Nice weekend!

    Linda

    Reply
  9. bruisedwee says:

    Hey Rusty, thanks for the very inspiring entry!

    And to Lin Hao, if he is reading this:

    Ni chen de si yi wei ying siong. Wo ting le ni de ku shi gan dong tao yan lei yi tian liu sia lai. Chen de hen chun jing ni! Wo yao siang ni shue si!

    Reply
  10. Linda says:

    On behalf of Lin Hao:

    Xie xie ni men, Uncle Rusty and Bruisedwee.

    wo zuo de shi hen duo ren dou hui zuo de
    ( I just did whatever many people would do).

    Sincerely,

    Lin Hao

    Reply
  11. Vanessa says:

    Dear Rusty,

    Just like you I was completely moved by the story and consequent prescence of Lin Hao at the Beijing Opening Ceremonies. I felt that it was very appropriate to have this little hero lead the way for the Chinese and really for all people who need an inspiration!

    I am an American teacher of 12-15 year olds and plan to use Lin Hao’s story to inspire my students when school begins. Sadly, many do not think that they can make a difference, yet it is the little things we do every day that make the difference. Lin Hao took his role seriously and made that difference. However, I am sure he would have done the same thing whether or not he was the hall monitor, a true leader usually does.

    So you know, I work in a very diverse neighborhood where crime is high and income low. But my students are brilliant and deserve to see “leaders” from all across the world.

    Lin hao is truly an inspiration! Thank you, Lin Hao, for touching our hearts all the way over here!

    Sincerely,
    “Miss Balderrama”
    Middle School Teacher
    Long Beach, California, USA

    Reply
  12. Rusty Lindquist says:

    Thanks so much for sharing, and what an honor to have a teacher comment. You’re the epidome of exactly the principle to which I refer. And I’m so glad to hear you sharing the story of Lin Hao with your kids – I think our children today need more heroes and role models like this, in the presence of so many other vastly less worthy ones.

    You have my prayers, and my best wishes. I hope you take a moment to read my tribute to teachers… To teach or not to teach.

    Rusty

    Reply
  13. adamson says:

    The story of Lin Hao was very inspiring to me, and I make sure to tell it to many people I know. What a young spirit!

    If you don’t mind, I linked this blog entry to my myspace in my ‘heroes’ space.

    -adamson

    Reply
  14. Linda says:

    Dear Balderrama,

    You said it exactly

    “I am sure he would have done the same thing whether or not he was the hall monitor, a true leader usually does.” Thank you for sharing Linhao’s story with your students and sharing your thoughts with us.
    I also agree with Rusty: Our childred today need heroes and role models like this.
    Children are our future. They need to be guided and to be inspired correctly.

    Linda

    Reply
  15. Lenny Poli says:

    Dear Mr.Rusty,

    Thank you so much for sharing this with all of us.

    I am an LDS Member from Italy who will move to Shanghai,China soon.

    From now little and corageous Lin Hao will be my hero as well.

    I really appreciate you because you let me know this story.

    Thank you brother. Thanks a lot.

    Best regards,

    Lenny Poli.

    Reply
  16. Joyce says:

    Hi! Hao has already demonstrated his leadership ability. He is on my prayer list because I want him to be a leader in good and important areas of life. I feel sure he will be that kind of leader because of the wonderful characteristics he already displayed at such a young age!

    Reply
  17. Susan says:

    There’s nothing worth beging proud of him. It was only an opportunity for him. If the earthquake didn’t take place in his home, he would remain obscure; if he were not the youngest hero in the quake, another hero who was the youngest would replace him in Bird’s Nest. If the earthquake took place in another place, maybe there would be a hero far better than him. Anyway, as a child growing up in the country, he musn’t know that after the earthquake, there were still aftershocks. He might think it was already safe after the shock so that he climbed into the ruins and saved his friends. Some people say that it is easier for adults to be heroes than for children, that is unfair. Adults are experienced, and they almost know everything! They know there are aftershocks after the quake, and they know if they climb into the ruins, what’s the worst result. They can save people as they know they may die; but a child just thinks everything easy. Lin Hao didn’t know there were aftershocks, he didn’t know what was actually the worst result for him, which is called ignorance. Therefore when we are praising his bravery, we’ve also praised his ignorance. That’s terrible! Ignorance brings bravery.It can be most lazy people’s excuse to be lazy always and do nothing for our world except daddling and wasting the world resource! Oh God! Poor adult heroes…and where’s the human race going?

    Reply
  18. Susan says:

    Hi Rusty, I’m from China. I’ll be in America in January to take part in the Model United Nation. I’ll carry my science fiction with me. As the speculations in my book all come true, the whole human race will be properly saved, but not only two children. I’m not bragging. I can do anything that you want me to do to prove it. I firmly believe I can be the second Jules Verne. It is my dream!

    Reply
  19. Susan says:

    Hi Rusty, I’m sorry for my sharp words above! I was just too upset in the afternoon.

    Yes, Lin Hao is quite a good example, however I think not only him, but all of the heroes, male and female, old and young, should be equally respected and cared about. Also, I think actually we should respect everyone especially children, ’cause children are the future of the world (and to be honest, I myself is a child at 15). Others didn’t do such great things maybe not because of cowardice, but only the opportunity didn’t come to them. If they were in the same situation as Lin Hao, I believe, most of them would do the same thing. So, everyone should be respected equally. (Of couse except those who are doubtlessly dead woods of the society.)

    Thanks for your praise for little Lin Hao and I wish he could have a great future. Your words have inspired me a lot, especially your words about making a sword, that I am greatly touched. I believe, if we are friends, you must be able to give me more inspirations like what my English friends have done so. (I went to England in July.) I love talking with such people very much! By the way, when I go to America in January for the Model United Nation, I’ll carry my science fiction with me. Wish I could send it to you then. You can take a look if you want to. And can I get the admission in both American universities and English universities only with my book?

    Thank you very much.

    Good luck with all you do in your life!

    Best Wishes,

    Susan

    Reply

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